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The Giant's Causeway

The Giant's Causeway is a formation of basaltic rock covering several acres on the north coast of Ireland. Formed from a lava flow some 50 to 60 million years ago, the basaltic rock rises in primarily hexagonal pillars. Just a few miles outside of the town of Bushmills (yes, that Bushmills), The Giant's Causeway is not to be missed.

According to Irish folklore the Giant's Causeway was built by sometimes high king, sometimes giant Finn McCool. Finn McCool built the causeway over the North Sea to Scotland to fight another giant named Benandonner. But it turned out that Benandonner was a much larger giant than Finn, so he ran back across the causeway to hide. Finn asked his wife Oonaugh what he should do and she told him to hide under a blanket and act like a baby. When Benandonner came looking for Finn he saw the baby and, growing frightened by the thought of the size of Finn McCool if his baby was that large, ran back across the causeway and tore it up behind him as he went.

oroboros on 2/20/2012 2:41:54 PM

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